CLOSING REMARKS BY H.E. AHMET DAVUTOĞLU PRIME MINISTER OF THE REPUBLIC OF TURKEY CO-CHAIR OF THE INTERACTIVE DIALOGUE ENTITLED “DELIVERING ON A REVITALISED GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP” UNITED NATIONS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

H.E. Ahmet Davutoğlu 26.09.2015

Honorable President Sall,


Excellencies,


Distinguished Participants,


I think this has been a very fruitful and successful session.


Before wrapping up, let me share with you some reflections that came to my mind, while listening to you.


First of all, at the heart of financing sustainable development goals, lies domestic resource mobilization.


We need to exert efforts on increasing domestic revenue such as capacity building, fair and effective tax systems, international cooperation in taxation, combatting illicit financial flows and encouraging women`s participation in labor markets.


Secondly, official development assistance still remains the most important source of development finance in the poorest and most vulnerable countries with limited domestic resources, in particular the least developed countries. We need to honor our commitments in a demand-driven perspective.


After all, our long term objective should be to create an environment where assistance will no longer be needed.


Thirdly, given the magnitude of resources required to achieve the sustainable development goals, we need to unleash other available resources, such as private investments.


A dynamic and well-functioning private sector is the key for supporting the development efforts in many countries.


For that to happen, private investors need predictability and confidence. Therefore, it is crucial to create an enabling environment for private sector investments.


Considering their share in economic activity and generating employment, supporting SMEs, particularly in low income and developing countries is crucial.


Fourthly, trade is another catalyzer for sustainable development. It is important for developing countries to have an access to financing for trade.


It is also important to strengthen universal, rules-based, equitable, non-discriminatory and open multilateral trading system.


WTO is the primary platform where these issues are discussed. But there is a strong synergy between the work in progress within the WTO and the 2030 Agenda.



Fifthly, enabling sustainable economic growth and poverty eradication also requires improving science, technology and innovation capacities.


The new “Technology Facilitation Mechanism (TFM)” we are launching at this Summit is an important deliverable of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda to ease the current technological gap.


As the sixth point, follow up and review will be vital for ensuring full success in the implementation of 2030 Agenda, including the SDGs.


Last but not least, we should aim to ensure that all segments of the society have access to benefits of growth and prosperity.


We have to adopt policies that promote financial inclusion and to establish inclusive economies by increasing economic participation by all, including women and youth.


Women’s empowerment is crucial not only from a social point of view, but also for its positive impact on economic growth. Gender equality and empowerment of women and girls should also be at the center of all our efforts.


I am delighted to say that the Turkish Presidency of G20 puts development at its center with due attention to all of these points that I have just listed.


Dear colleagues,


Development cooperation is not an issue of charity.


Better integrating all country groups to the world economic system is crucial to bring growth and prosperity to the developing countries.


This will ultimately be the new engine of growth globally.


We need to create a more inclusive and equitable system of global partnership with the engagement of all advanced, emerging and developing countries on the basis of mutual respect and benefit.


Now let me wrap the session.